State Lockout/Tagout Regulations On The Control of Hazardous Energy

September 03, 2021 12 min read

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a federal agency in charge of enforcing workplace rules for worker safety. OSHA standard 1910.147 lays out the requirements for the control of hazardous energy in workplaces. 

The regulation requires the lockout and tagout of equipment or machinery that, if unexpectedly energized, could harm workers during servicing or repair. Hazardous energy can pertain to electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other kinds of energy that can be potentially harmful.

Although Federal OSHA sets national standards on occupational safety and health, more than half of the US states have their own programs run by their respective state departments. If a state has its own workplace safety and health standards, they must meet or exceed the federal standards. A state can have one of the following:

  • OSHA-approved State Plan: The state has an OSHA-approved occupational safety and health program that governs both private and public sector workplaces in the state.
  • OSHA-approved State Plan for the Public Sector: The state has an OSHA-approved occupational safety and health program, but only for the public sector. Private businesses and organizations are governed by federal OSHA.
  • Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: The state has no OSHA-approved occupational safety and health program. The state’s private sector is governed by federal OSHA. It may or may not have a non-OSHA-approved program that governs the public sector.

Below are each state’s lockout/tagout policies on the control of hazardous energy, with reference to federal OSHA’s requirements.

OSHA-Approved State Plan

OSHA-approved State Plan for the Public Sector

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction

Alabama

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Alabama does not have its own federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. This state follows OSHA’s requirements for lockout/tagout. It does not have any state or federal laws on workplace safety in the public sector.

Alaska

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Alaska Occupational Safety and Health Section (AKOSH) administers and enforces the state’s workplace safety standards. By reference of 8 AAC 61.1010, it adopts the federal standard for lockout/tagout.

The state administrative code also adds a stricter requirement that prohibits the use of double block and bleed systems in the lockout/tagout process. This is mainly due to Alaska’s sub-freezing temperature, which would freeze pipe contents and thereby prevent draining.

Arizona

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health (ADOSH) oversees workplace safety regulations and requirements in the state. As per AZ Admin. Code R20-5-602, the state adopts by reference the federal standard for the control of hazardous energy in general industry. 

Arkansas

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Arkansas does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA implements and enforces workplace safety and health requirements in the private sector. The state labor department’s Arkansas Occupational Safety and Health (AOSH) program enforces these regulations and requirements in the public sector.

California

OSHA-approved State Plan: California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) is in charge of the state’s workplace safety and health regulations. It follows the federal rules for the control of hazardous energy. However, 8 CCR 3314 and8 CCR 2320.4 to 2320.6 include additional requirements for the maintenance and repair of certain electrical equipment.

Colorado

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Colorado does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Currently, there are no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Connecticut

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Connecticut does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector only. 

The Connecticut Department of Labor, Division of Occupational Safety and Health (CONN-OSHA) implements workplace safety and health in the state’s public sector. It adopts the federal lockout/tagout standard for general industry.

Delaware

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Delaware does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Currently, there are no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Florida

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Florida does not have federally approved occupational safety and health regulations. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. There are no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Georgia

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Georgia does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory body. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Aright-to-know law by the state requires public sector employers to inform workers about potentially hazardous chemicals in the workplace. Aside from that, Georgia has no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Hawaii

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Hawaii Occupational Safety and Health (HIOSH) division is in charge of administering and enforcing workplace safety and health standards in private and public sectors of the state. As per HAR 12-67.2, it follows, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control in general industry workplaces. 

Idaho

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Idaho does not have federally approved occupational safety and health standards. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector.

As for the public sector, the Idaho Division of Building Safety implements and enforces workplace and health regulations on government offices and operations. By reference of ID Admin. Code 17.10.01, the state adheres to the federal safety and health standards for the public sector. It does not mention any additional requirements concerning lockout/tagout.

Illinois

OSHA-approved State Plan for the Public Sector: The Illinois Division of Safety Inspection and Education is in charge of implementing occupational safety and health of the public sector only. As per 56 IL Admin. Code 350.300, the state adheres to federal standards for workplace safety and health.

As for the state’s private sector, OSHA oversees workplace safety and health standards for private businesses and nonprofit organizations.

Indiana

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration (IOSHA) enforces workplace safety and health standards for both the state’s public and private sectors. As per 620 IAC 1-1-1, it adopts the federal standard for hazardous energy control in general industry settings.

Iowa

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Iowa Occupational Health and Safety Administration (Iowa OSHA) is in charge of implementing workplace health and safety rules in the state. As per IAC 875-10.20(88) and IAC 875-26.1(88), it follows federal standards for general industry and construction, including the requirements for lockout/tagout.

Kansas

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Kansas does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. As for the public sector, KS Stat. Ann. 44-636 states that government offices, operations, and schools are governed by abatement orders that can cite federal standards when citing violations.

Kentucky

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Kentucky Occupational Safety and Health (KyOSH) Program is in charge of safety and health in all public and private workplaces, except for federal facilities. It adopts federal standard for lockout/tagout of equipment in general industry. However, 803 KAR 2:309 imposes stricter guidelines on the use of tags for energy-isolating devices.

Louisiana

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Louisiana does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. The public sector, however, must abide by the state’s Loss Prevention Program. This program requires each agency to assess whether or not their workplace needs site- or task-specific safety rules to ensure the safety of their employees.

Maine

OSHA-approved State Plan for the Public Sector: The Workplace Safety Division, under the Maine Department of Labor, oversees occupational safety and health in the public sector. The state follows federal lockout/tagout guidelines in government agencies, commissions, and schools, as per Code of ME Rules (CMR) 12-179-002 (general industry) and CMR 12-179-003 (construction).

As for the private sector, OSHA oversees workplace safety and health for private businesses and nonprofit organizations.

Maryland

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH) administers workplace health and safety rules in the state. As per COMAR 09.12.31, it adopts by reference the federal requirements for hazardous energy control.

Massachusetts

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Massachusetts follows federal requirements for occupational safety and health and does not have its own federally approved regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. As for the public sector, the state’s Division of Occupational Safety is in charge of enforcing workplace safety and health regulations.

Michigan

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration (MIOSHA) is in charge of workplace safety and health compliance in public and private sectors of the state. MAC r. 408.18501 and MAC r. 408.18502 adopt, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

Minnesota

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry (MDLI) implements workplace and health rules in the state. As per MR 5205.0010, it adopts, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

Mississippi

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Mississippi follows the federal standard for hazardous energy control as it does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Currently, there are no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Missouri

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Missouri does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Currently, there are no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Montana

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Montana does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA administers and enforces workplace safety and health in businesses and nonprofit organizations in Montana.

The Safety and Health Bureau, under the Montana Department of Labor and Industry, oversees occupational safety and health, but only for the public sector. According to Admin. Rules of MT 24.30.102, the state adopts, by reference, the federal standard for lockout/tagout for local and state government offices and operations.

Nebraska

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Nebraska does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Currently, there are no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Nevada

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Division of Industrial Relations under the Nevada Department of Business and Industry implements occupational safety and health rules in the state. As per NRS 618.295, it adopts by reference the federal hazardous energy control standard.

New Hampshire

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: New Hampshire does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Its private sector complies with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health.

For the public sector workplaces, the Safety and Training Division under the New Hampshire Department of Labor enforces safety and health guidelines. NH Regulations-Labor 1403.32 adopts lockout/tagout requirements that are less detailed than the federal standard.

New Jersey

OSHA-approved State Plan for the Public Sector: The Public Employees Occupational Safety and Health (PEOSH), under the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development enforces occupational safety and health in the public sector. According to NJAC 12:100-4.2, it adopts the federal standards on the lockout/tagout of hazardous energy. 

However, New Jersey does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program for the private sector. Businesses and nonprofit organizations must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health. 

New Mexico

OSHA-approved State Plan: New Mexico’s Occupational Safety and Health Bureau (OSHB) oversees the implementation of occupational safety and health standards in the state. As per NMSA 50-9-13 and NMAC 5.2.9, the state adopts the federal hazardous energy control standard.

New York

OSHA-approved State Plan for the Public Sector: For New York, the Public Employee Safety and Health (PESH) Bureau, under the New York Department of Labor, enforces occupational safety and health in the public sector. As per 12 NYCRR 800.3, the state adopts, by reference, the federal hazardous energy control standard. 

For the private sector, however, New York does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Businesses and nonprofit organizations must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health.

North Carolina

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Occupational Safety and Health Division (OSH), under the North Carolina Department of Labor, oversees the implementation of occupational safety and health standards in the state. Under 13 NCAC 7F.0101 and 7F.0201, the state adopts, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control in general industry and construction.

North Dakota

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: North Dakota does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Federal OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Currently, there are no federal or state regulations on workplace safety in the public sector.

Ohio

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Ohio does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Businesses and nonprofit organizations must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health. 

The Division of Safety and Hygiene Services, under the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, enforces occupational safety and health in the public sector. As per Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 4167-3-01, it adopts, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control in general industry and construction. 

Oklahoma

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction:  Oklahoma does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Businesses and nonprofit organizations must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health.

The Public Employees Occupational Safety and Health Unit, under the Oklahoma Department of Labor, enforces occupational safety and health in the public sector. According to Oklahoma Administrative Code 380:40-1-22, it adopts, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control. 

Oregon

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Occupational Safety and Health Division, under the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces occupational safety and health in both public and private sector workplaces in the state. OAR 437-002-0140 adopts the federal standard for hazardous energy control. It also adds another rule that limits access to keys or combinations to locks.

Pennsylvania

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Pennsylvania does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Federal OSHA oversees workplace safety and health in the state’s private sector. Meanwhile, the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry oversees workplace safety and health in the public sector. However, there are no federal or state regulations on lockout/tagout in this sector.

Rhode Island

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Rhode Island does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Private companies and organizations must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health.

South Carolina

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Division of Occupational Safety and Health, under the South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing, & Regulation, enforces occupational safety and health in the state. As per R. 71 Subarticles 6 and 7, it adopts the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

South Dakota

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: South Dakota does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Private companies and organizations must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health.

There are no state or federal laws overseeing workplace safety and health in the public sector, except South Dakota Codified Law 3-6A-27. This statute gives a general standard for the South Dakota Bureau of Personnel to develop programs that improve state employees’ performance. These programs include training, safety, health, counseling, and welfare.

Tennessee

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health Administration (TOSHA), under the state’s Department of Labor and Workforce Development, implements occupational safety and health regulations in the state. According to Rule 0800-1-1-.06, it follows, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

Texas

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Texas does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Businesses and non-government organizations must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health. There are no state or federal laws overseeing workplace safety and health in the state’s public sector.

Utah

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Utah Occupational Safety and Health Administration (UOSH) division, under the state’s Labor Commission, oversees occupational safety and health regulations in the state’s public and private sector workplaces. As per R614-1-4, it adopts, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

Vermont

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Vermont Occupational Safety and Health Administration (VOSHA), under the state’s Department of Labor, is in charge of workplace safety and health regulations in the state. As per  VAR 24-050-007, it follows, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

Virginia

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Virginia Department of Labor and Industry is in charge of workplace safety and health regulations in the state. According to 16 VAC 25-90-1910, it follows the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

Washington

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Washington State Department of Labor and Industry implements and enforces regulations on occupational safety and health. By reference, it follows the federal standard for hazardous energy control. However, WAC 296-803-99 to 296-803-100 adds gravity to the definition of energy sources. This addition further expands the regulation to include gravity-powered equipment.

West Virginia

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: West Virginia does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Businesses, non-government organizations, and other establishments in the private sector must comply with OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health.

The West Virginia Division of Labor is in charge of maintaining regulations on occupational safety and health in the state’s public sector. As per WV Regulations 42-15-4 and 42-15-5, it adopts the federal standard for hazardous energy control. However, public sector rules do not apply to the Department of Corrections, Department of Health, and the Legislature.

Wisconsin

Federal OSHA Jurisdiction: Wisconsin does not have a federally approved occupational safety and health regulatory program. Private sector workplaces are governed by federal OSHA’s standards for workplace safety and health.

For the state’s public sector, the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services oversees regulations on workplace safety and health. According to SPS 332.50, it adopts, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

Wyoming

OSHA-approved State Plan: The Worker Safety and Compensation Division, under the Wyoming Department of Workforce Services, implements and enforces standards on occupational safety and health. As per WCWR 025-120-001, it adopts, by reference, the federal standard for hazardous energy control.

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Herbert Post

Born in the Philadelphia area and raised in Houston by a family who was predominately employed in heavy manufacturing. Herb took a liking to factory processes and later safety compliance where he has spent the last 13 years facilitating best practices and teaching updated regulations. He is married with two children and a St Bernard named Jose. Herb is a self-described compliance geek. When he isn’t studying safety reports and regulatory interpretations he enjoys racquetball and watching his favorite football team, the Dallas Cowboys.


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